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917 "C" Street
San Rafael, California 94901
(415) 457-4878
yia@youthinarts.org

RISING STARS Showcases High School Artists

Nearly 300 people attended the Artists’ Awards Reception for RISING STARS, which drew student artists, their parents, grandparents, friends and teachers who braved the rain to see Marin County’s top high school art work on display.

The 28th annual high school exhibition at the YIA Gallery, on view through March 29, features nearly 150 paintings, photographs, drawings, sculptures and mixed media works. 16 public, private and alternative high schools are included in the show.

San Rafael High School student Amelie Benicio, 16, won the Best of Show prize. Benicio and Redwood High School student Nick Cook, who won the top prize in the mixed media division, were featured this week in a Marin IJ article.

Benicio, a student of teacher Annie Yi, said her charcoal and newsprint mixed media portrait depicts the “quirky yet fearful personality” of a character called “Crazy Eyes” from a popular television show. ”I thought it showed a lot of emotion,” Benicio said, after learning she’d won. “I like the eyes and the shading because it came out a lot better than I expected.”

The exhibit was blindy judged by a panel that included artists Lynn SondagKay CarlsonJason Dunn and Jay Daniel, owner of Black Cat Studio.

Nick Cook, 18, won for a mixed media piece called “Human Circus.” Art materials he used included markers, stickers and paint pens. Cook is one of five artists who won San Francisco Beautiful’s 2019 Muni art contest. His art is now featured on several Muni buses. Speaking about his piece in RISING STARS, Cook said the work deals with the issue of identity and how people choose to reveal their personalities. ”People just aren’ that comfortable expressing themselves,” he said. Cook studies AP Art at Redwood High School with teacher Lauren Bartone and hopes to attend Parsons School of Design.

Please join us for the public opening reception: Friday, February 8, 5 pm–8pm

RISING STARS: Feb. 3–March 29, 11 am–4 pm, M–F
YIA GALLERY
917 C Street
San Rafael, CA 94901
 

Spreading the Message About Arts Equity

Youth in Arts staff, Miko Lee, Suzanne Joyal and Kelsey Rieger have been presenting on arts equity as a tool to begin implementation of the Marin Arts Education Plan. On January 29 the team conducted a 3-hour interactive workshop for Marin County educators and administrators at Marin Community Foundation. Participants learned about the recent data released from the California Data Project and reflected on the Race Counts study. They watched “A Student Named Art” student produced film from the California Arts Education Alliance and deconstructed the video using Visual Thinking Strategies. They learned about the latest in arts education research, created a collaborative mural and used theatre to explore language arts and history links.

Thank you for the amazing presentation you and your team so beautifully engaged us in yesterday.  It was wonderful how you kept everybody engaged while instilling some crucial facts about the powerful impact art can provide students.  Observing the group, I feel confident that each person present will be sharing this information with others and thinking more about how to take the next steps within their district or school.”

-Eileen Smith, Marin County Office of Education Director of Education Services

That same night Miko & Kelsey provided similar workshop for the North Bay PTA leads and provided information about CREATE California’s Public Will Campaign.  For more info about this workshop, reach out to us: mlee@youthinarts.org

 

 

Family Artists respond to Student IJ Story

IJ Article 2040 1-24-19On January 24, the Marin IJ published an article written by fifth graders working with Shirl Buss, YIA Mentor Architect and educator with UC Berkeley’s Y-PLAN.

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On Thursday night, Laurel Dell hosted a Family Art Night for second and third-graders. Families were able to visit the gallery of works created over the Fall, and to participate in a hands-on art-making experience.

YIA Mentor Artists Cathy Bowman and Suzanne Joyal asked students and families to respond the IJ story: What do YOU want for San Rafael’s future? What important words can you read? Circle them. Now, choose the MOST important word, and turn it into a piece of art that fills your whole page.

Each student and family member found a word in the article that was important to them, and turned it into one of the mini-artworks you find here.

Lastly, we glued all of the pieces together into this one cohesive collage.

The students ranged in age from TK (PATHS), to third grade (ELECTRIC from a kid who says he doesn’t feel safe walking in his neighborhood at night). We saw parents translating for each other, children reading to their parents, and even tiny little pre-readers able to pick out letters and begin their journey to reading.

Here is a link to a member of the community in Fairfax who wrote a letter to the MarinIJ entitled:  “Inspired by Youngsters ideas on Sea-Level Rise”.

Thank you California Arts Council for your generous support!

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A successful semester of art at Compass Academy

 

Compass Academy is an alternative elementary/middle/high school for students who experience underlying mental health challenges. Marty Meade, a certified Art Therapist  who works year-round with Compass Academy, says of her goal is to have the students “connect with the creative process, and to know that it is a safe space to inhabit when they are feeling powerless.”

She expands on their projects over the last semester, explaining: “We have painted with watercolors and acrylics, decorated sugar skulls, and made fused glass pendants and small plates.  The students have experimented with marbling paper and some print making as well. We play with concepts like scale, sometimes working big and sometimes in miniature. For some, it’s a process of learning to live with mistakes and let go, and for others it’s a time to slow down.”

Every day brings new adventure, and sometimes new challenges. Students who are new to the class in particular can experience understandable hesitation. Marty explains “I have new students who come in feeling unsure and occasionally defensive. One particular high school student painted a beautiful apple on her first day, but when I complimented her, her response was that she ‘didn’t like art’. I backed off, and as the following weeks went by she became more and more engaged. Her Sugar skull was delicate as was the trinket box that she carefully painted. Last week we did marbling and I gave them straws to blow the paint around in the water. She soon was dropping the dyes into the bubbles and then experimented with dish detergent. On Halloween as they were painting masks I read two stories from Grimm Fairy Tales. She immediately knew the version of Cinderella, and giggled as I read the vivid descriptions of the stepsisters trying on the shoe. All the while, I’m watching the hard-edged woman become a playful child again.”

However, time has had a positive effect on many of her students. Now in his second year, one student has transformed from being disruptive to the class leader. Marty notes that “his art is wonderful, and I’m trying to think of a creative way to gather his images of cats.” Another student, who Marty refers to as “I”, can hardly contain himself during art class and loves making things for his mother. Marty builds on these experiences to help students think about who they are and how their work might reflect their character, beliefs, and values. During the trinket box project, Marty brought in uncut rocks with opals inside and asked everyone to pick a stone that they felt reflected them most. She adds, “They were all very careful as they examined the stones.”

Marty credits her time in the classroom to the collaboration of the Marin County Office of Education and Youth in Arts. She is grateful for the opportunity to be with the children for the entire school year, and adds: “It has made such a difference in my relationship to the students.”

Thank you to the contract from the Kennedy Center and the funders who helped to make this happen:

 

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