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Artists Shine at RISING STARS Awards Reception!

Dozens of young artists and their families celebrated at the Artists Awards Reception for RISING STARS, the annual Youth in Arts exhibit that showcases the best of public, private and alternative high school art.

Sir Francis Drake High School student Annabelle Sulprizio won Best of Show for her pair of beautifully carved vases. Other award winners included Alessandra Sutton for Best Painting, Helen Kun for Best Photograph, Keira Engler for Best Sculpture, Lily Gates for Best Drawing, and Ina Kim for Best Mixed Media. The full list of winners can be found HERE.

Nearly 300 people turned out in the bright sunshine and rotated through the show at a private reception on Sunday. The show features painting, drawing, sculpture, mixed media, photography, printmaking and digital media.

Annabelle said Geometric/Repeat Pattern Vase Set was inspired by videos she watched showing master carvers from Japan and China. Sulprizio takes honor ceramics with teacher Beth Cederstrom. “I call her my at school mom,” Annabelle said. “She make the ceramics room a space where you can feel comfortable and like you are at at home.”

“What really stood out about this piece was the intricate detail. It was the only work that the judges unanimously chose as the winner of a category,” said Morgan Schauffler, development associate at Youth in Arts who organized the show and manages the gallery.

The group artwork from TeamWorks program at Loma Alta School, an art education program that supports students involved in the juvenile justice system, won the new Rezaian Family Award given by Youth in Arts’ board president Naomi Tamura and her family. TeamWorks director Katya McCulloch said the work, titled C.H.O.I.C.E., is a mixed media piece that features many different keys; the “O” holds the keyhole. The title stands for Creating Healthy Choices In Challenging Environments. “I loved it,” Katya said. “I feel like we’ve touched on the soul of what TeamWorks is about. The choice is the key – making healthy choices.”

Dylan, an artist at Compass Academy who studies with Youth in Arts’ Mentor Artist Marty Meade, won an award from AC Graphics for her untitled digital painting of a saber-toothed cyclops lynx. “I absolutely love cyclops,” Dylan shared.

College of Marin also awarded six scholarships to best of show and best in category winners, giving them a semester of tuition-free classes.

The show runs through March 27. The opening reception will be held Feb. 14 from 5 to 8 p.m., which coincides with the 2nd Friday Art Walk in San Rafael. 

The exhibition was blindly adjudicated.This year’s judges included painter Kay Carlson from Marin Open Studios; sculptor and fine arts instructor Patricia Hulin from College of Marin; photographer and creative consultant Melissa McArdle; and Lynn Sondag, chair of Dominican University’s Department of Art, Art History, Media and Design. Thank you to our sponsors AC Graphics, College of Marin, Il Davide, Marin Open Studios, Perry’s Art Supplies & Framing, the Walker Rezaian family, RileyStreet Art Supply and the San Anselmo Arts Commission.

Artist Susan Diglioni founded Rising Stars in 1991, believing that young artists should be recognized for their talents.The exhibit travels to the Marin Center in April, where it will be on display in the Bartolini Gallery April 9 – May 31.

The YIA Gallery is one of the few in the nation devoted to showcasing children’s art. Regular gallery hours are Monday to Friday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Compass Student’s Story from RISING STARS

MMeade_Compass_Student MMarty Meade, has been a Youth in Arts Mentor Artist for well over 20 years. Through our Arts Unite Us program, Marty has worked with students at Compass Academy (formerly Braun High School), an alternative elementary/middle/high school for students who experience underlying mental health challenges. She teaches students how to create artwork in a variety of media including, but not limited to painting, drawing, printmaking, and even glass making! The stories she shares in conjunction with the caliber of work her students produce continues to astound.

Marty enters many of her students in RISING STARS each year. This year’s blindly adjudicated exhibition, features 6 works by six Compass academy students, including anonymous student “M” who won the Youth in Arts award. “M was blown away with the award,” Marty shared, “and the staff was too. His response with the award, was immediate doubt, ‘but I’m not very good.’ He received it with the middle school and high school kids present. Everyone applauded, and I reminded him that the judges were professionals, and that all they had was a number and not a name. There was a moment when I saw him sink into his chair and tears filled his eyes.”

M, like many of the students at Compass, experienced trauma at an early age. His winning entry into RISING STARS is a block print on watercolor paper entitled, Self Portraits. “He has been drawing the image from day one, regardless of the assignment,” Marty said. “He has used acrylics, India ink, permanent markers with marbling, etc. I just let him do it and often wonder where it comes from. He did have a beautiful fish painting…but when I asked him which to choose [for the show] he instantly picked the prints.”

“My wonderful students at Compass confront challenging mental health or emotional struggles. The fact that they only get 45 minutes of art each week is unbelievable, and yet they make such wonderful art. I have been deeply moved that our students have been able to receive awards in spite of this limitation.”

Thank you, Marty for all you do!

 

A successful semester of art at Compass Academy

 

Compass Academy is an alternative elementary/middle/high school for students who experience underlying mental health challenges. Marty Meade, a certified Art Therapist  who works year-round with Compass Academy, says of her goal is to have the students “connect with the creative process, and to know that it is a safe space to inhabit when they are feeling powerless.”

She expands on their projects over the last semester, explaining: “We have painted with watercolors and acrylics, decorated sugar skulls, and made fused glass pendants and small plates.  The students have experimented with marbling paper and some print making as well. We play with concepts like scale, sometimes working big and sometimes in miniature. For some, it’s a process of learning to live with mistakes and let go, and for others it’s a time to slow down.”

Every day brings new adventure, and sometimes new challenges. Students who are new to the class in particular can experience understandable hesitation. Marty explains “I have new students who come in feeling unsure and occasionally defensive. One particular high school student painted a beautiful apple on her first day, but when I complimented her, her response was that she ‘didn’t like art’. I backed off, and as the following weeks went by she became more and more engaged. Her Sugar skull was delicate as was the trinket box that she carefully painted. Last week we did marbling and I gave them straws to blow the paint around in the water. She soon was dropping the dyes into the bubbles and then experimented with dish detergent. On Halloween as they were painting masks I read two stories from Grimm Fairy Tales. She immediately knew the version of Cinderella, and giggled as I read the vivid descriptions of the stepsisters trying on the shoe. All the while, I’m watching the hard-edged woman become a playful child again.”

However, time has had a positive effect on many of her students. Now in his second year, one student has transformed from being disruptive to the class leader. Marty notes that “his art is wonderful, and I’m trying to think of a creative way to gather his images of cats.” Another student, who Marty refers to as “I”, can hardly contain himself during art class and loves making things for his mother. Marty builds on these experiences to help students think about who they are and how their work might reflect their character, beliefs, and values. During the trinket box project, Marty brought in uncut rocks with opals inside and asked everyone to pick a stone that they felt reflected them most. She adds, “They were all very careful as they examined the stones.”

Marty credits her time in the classroom to the collaboration of the Marin County Office of Education and Youth in Arts. She is grateful for the opportunity to be with the children for the entire school year, and adds: “It has made such a difference in my relationship to the students.”

Thank you to the contract from the Kennedy Center and the funders who helped to make this happen:

 

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