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Novato High School – The Persona and the Self

Students in Maria Romero’s class at Novato High School worked with Mentor Artist Lisa Summers through YIA’s  Arts Unite Us (AUU) program. Lisa designed lessons around prompts and activities that used old photos, pieces of familiar toys, quick dry clay, and pastels to explore themes of social justice, culture, and family. The first activity was a sketching challenge based on David Hockney’s Polaroid mosaics. Students and teachers created mosaic portraits using pencils and Lyra Graphite crayons on Post-It notes, copying from squares of cut up images of activists Malcom X, Dolores Huerta, and Julia Butterfly Hill. They were then tasked with reassembling the image as a group. When Post-It notes were matched up to corresponding squares, students reflected on how shapes, shadows, and lines come together to make a composite image.

In looking at a single Post-It note, is there another composition there? What different styles of interpretation can you see in individual drawings? What is different about a group portrait as opposed to one created by an individual artist?

Because several of Maria Romero’s students are in the MSA Visual Arts program, experience and skills varied widely in the class. The idea behind many of the activities and lessons was to experiment different styles, collaborative art-making, and as an opportunity to look at a face as a way of familiarizing oneself with the “other,” even when that other is the self.

 

Thank you to the following organizations for making this program possible: 

 

Artists Shine at RISING STARS Awards Reception!

Dozens of young artists and their families celebrated at the Artists Awards Reception for RISING STARS, the annual Youth in Arts exhibit that showcases the best of public, private and alternative high school art.

Sir Francis Drake High School student Annabelle Sulprizio won Best of Show for her pair of beautifully carved vases. Other award winners included Alessandra Sutton for Best Painting, Helen Kun for Best Photograph, Keira Engler for Best Sculpture, Lily Gates for Best Drawing, and Ina Kim for Best Mixed Media. The full list of winners can be found HERE.

Nearly 300 people turned out in the bright sunshine and rotated through the show at a private reception on Sunday. The show features painting, drawing, sculpture, mixed media, photography, printmaking and digital media.

Annabelle said Geometric/Repeat Pattern Vase Set was inspired by videos she watched showing master carvers from Japan and China. Sulprizio takes honor ceramics with teacher Beth Cederstrom. “I call her my at school mom,” Annabelle said. “She make the ceramics room a space where you can feel comfortable and like you are at at home.”

“What really stood out about this piece was the intricate detail. It was the only work that the judges unanimously chose as the winner of a category,” said Morgan Schauffler, development associate at Youth in Arts who organized the show and manages the gallery.

The group artwork from TeamWorks program at Loma Alta School, an art education program that supports students involved in the juvenile justice system, won the new Rezaian Family Award given by Youth in Arts’ board president Naomi Tamura and her family. TeamWorks director Katya McCulloch said the work, titled C.H.O.I.C.E., is a mixed media piece that features many different keys; the “O” holds the keyhole. The title stands for Creating Healthy Choices In Challenging Environments. “I loved it,” Katya said. “I feel like we’ve touched on the soul of what TeamWorks is about. The choice is the key – making healthy choices.”

Dylan, an artist at Compass Academy who studies with Youth in Arts’ Mentor Artist Marty Meade, won an award from AC Graphics for her untitled digital painting of a saber-toothed cyclops lynx. “I absolutely love cyclops,” Dylan shared.

College of Marin also awarded six scholarships to best of show and best in category winners, giving them a semester of tuition-free classes.

The show runs through March 27. The opening reception will be held Feb. 14 from 5 to 8 p.m., which coincides with the 2nd Friday Art Walk in San Rafael. 

The exhibition was blindly adjudicated.This year’s judges included painter Kay Carlson from Marin Open Studios; sculptor and fine arts instructor Patricia Hulin from College of Marin; photographer and creative consultant Melissa McArdle; and Lynn Sondag, chair of Dominican University’s Department of Art, Art History, Media and Design. Thank you to our sponsors AC Graphics, College of Marin, Il Davide, Marin Open Studios, Perry’s Art Supplies & Framing, the Walker Rezaian family, RileyStreet Art Supply and the San Anselmo Arts Commission.

Artist Susan Diglioni founded Rising Stars in 1991, believing that young artists should be recognized for their talents.The exhibit travels to the Marin Center in April, where it will be on display in the Bartolini Gallery April 9 – May 31.

The YIA Gallery is one of the few in the nation devoted to showcasing children’s art. Regular gallery hours are Monday to Friday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Youth in Arts at the Marin County Fair

 

Youth in Arts’ award-winning a cappella group, ‘Til Dawn, sang to an enthusiastic crowd on the opening day of the Marin County Fair this summer. The group is the longest running year-round teen ensemble in the Bay Area. It was the last public performance for the group’s outgoing seniors (Kathryn Hasson, Angel Gregorian, Maud Utstein and Will Noyce) as well as ‘Til Dawn member Lara Burgert, who is moving. The ensemble is directed by singer-songwriter Austin Willacy, who performs as a solo artist and also with his own a cappella band, The House Jacks.

Four collaborative works created during Youth in Arts’ residencies this spring took home top ribbons. The mixed media work, inspired by artist Jasper Johns, was created during a 10-week Arts Unite Us program with Youth in Arts Mentor Artist Cathy Bowman.

Student projects from San Ramon Elementary School and Willow Creek Academy won blue ribbons in their age division. Novato High School and Sinaloa Middle School classes each won second place in their age divisions. The San Ramon piece also won the Anne Davis award for best of class (collage) in the 9-12 year-old group.

“Each class created richly layered works that were different from each other,” Bowman said. “It was a privilege to work with such dedicated artists.”

Bowman also won the Charles M. Schulz award for a pig cartoon and a blue ribbon for a second cartoon.

The prize-winning student art will be on display at Youth In Arts as part of “Outside the Lines: Collaborative Art in Special Day Classrooms.” The exhibit opens July 31.

Through the California Department of Education’s Student Support and Academic Enrichment (SSAE) grant that the Marin County Office of Education received, Youth in Arts was in multiple Special Day Classes this spring.

Mask Making at Novato High

Students at Novato High School and Sinaloa Middle School explored issues of identity and representation through mask making during 10-week residencies with Mentor Artist Cathy Bowman.

We began by painting glue onto a plastic mold taped to a piece of mat board, being careful to work to the edges. Then we chose scraps of tissue paper is colors that spoke to us. Some students chose a single color, while others preferred to use several colors. Every piece of tissue paper we touched, we had to tear.

We pressed the tissue paper onto the masks and added another layer of glue then let them dry. The following week we used metallic Sharpies. For this lesson we referred back to a project we did at the beginning, where we transformed five words about ourselves into different lines.  We used those lines as inspiration, repeating them on the masks.

 

 

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Exploring Identity through Lines and Patterns at Novato H.S.

As part of Youth in Arts’ Arts Unite Us program, students at Novato High School explored identity with Mentor Artist Cathy Bowman. The 10-week residency kicked off with personal exploration, creating abstract self portraits using emotive and descriptive lines and shapes. The project was a fun and engaging way to asses where each of our new students was at and acted as a safe introduction to self-portraiture. By using materials that students were used to and tapping into our human love of doodling, we were able to start building a vocabulary around what a portrait and art can be.


We began by coming up with a list of five adjectives to describe ourselves – these adjectives could describe the things we liked, who we imagined ourselves to be, or what we were good at. Then we turned each word into a line by asking ourselves: “What kind of line is “curious”? What kind of line is “awesome”? How do we draw “grumpy”?” We explored these questions and more, thinking about the characteristics that we associate with certain words and what they might look like in our everyday lives. We then started our drawings by sketching in pencil as we brainstormed the visual meaning of each word we had chosen. For the final project using gold and silver Sharpies and black canvas boards, we made patterns using our lines. Some of us covered the entire canvas with linear patterns while others worked in a more freeform and organic way. We talked about issues of identity and what we choose to reveal about ourselves in our work and in our everyday lives.

 

Through the California Department of Education’s Student Support and Academic Enrichment (SSAE) Grant that Marin County Office of Education received, we are in multiple Special Day Classrooms. This residency is one of the programs that have benefitted from this collaboration.

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